Review: Amazfit Arc Wearable Activity Tracker

What Is the Amazfit Arc?

The Amazfit Arc is a wearable device that primarily measures steps, sleep quality, and heart rate. It’s water-resistant, so you are supposed to be able to wear it in the shower, but I’ve never done that. I have, however, been caught in the rain while wearing it and it was fine afterwards.

What I Like About the Amazfit Arc

  • It’s extremely comfortable. I wear it all day and night until it needs recharging and I barely notice it’s even on.
  • Speaking of recharging, the company advertises a 20-day battery life and I can confirm that. The first time I wore it, I only got 17 days, but I think I was checking it a lot more because it was new. After recharging it, I got to 20 days and was still at 9 or 10% charge. This is a HUGE plus for me. I have enough trouble keeping all my other devices charged; I don’t need to add another one to the list. I don’t remember how long it took to recharge, but it didn’t bother me, so I assume it wasn’t excessive. 🙂
  • The app was easy to set up and pair with the device using Bluetooth. It also has all the main information laid out in an easy-to-read format.

  • It’s very simple to use. Each time you tap a certain spot on the face, it scrolls through the following info: Time, Daily Steps, Mileage, Heart Rate (after about 5 seconds), and Battery Level. You can also use a setting in the app to display the info just by lifting your wrist and then rotating your arm to scroll through the different measurements, but I found it would turn on when I was just about to fall asleep, so I turned that option off.
  • The heart rate detector works well for me (but I have seen reviews from other people saying they can’t get it to work, so FYI…).
  • The app also has an alarm setting and options to make the Arc vibrate when you’ve reached your steps goal, when you haven’t moved in an hour, and when you get a call or text on your phone.

What I Don’t Like About the Amazfit Arc

  • The screen is incredibly difficult to read outdoors, even when it’s overcast.
  • It has its own proprietary charger, rather than using a standard micro USB port. This is a pet peeve of mine with a lot of new devices coming out.
  • While the step count is accurate, the mileage count is significantly off. There’s no way to input your stride length or any other piece of data to improve the mileage accuracy. It also has a calorie burning counter, but I always assume those are way off, so I just ignore that altogether. 🙂

My Two Cents

I tried two other fitness/activity trackers (Jawbone UP 24 and Pebble Time Round) before I tried the Arc and I have to say the third time’s the charm. The UP didn’t have a face, so the only way to get info was through the app and the Pebble required you to press too many buttons to get it. The Arc may not track as much data as some devices, but it’s super easy to access what it does.

NOTE: I never tried a Fitbit because when I was originally looking at trackers, they were much more expensive than the others. However, I see now that they do have models that are comparable in price to the Arc, which is $69.99. However, I have no idea how they stack up feature-wise.

So if you’re looking for a very basic tracker that’s easy to wear and easy to use, I definitely recommend the Amazfit Arc.

Learn more about the Arc on the Amazfit website. >>

Elizabeth Kricfalusi

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